Potential Complaints

On eligibility of potential complaints

 



What can I do if my employer refuses to accommodate my disability or religious beliefs?

In Canada, employers and service providers (such as your bank, your wireless carrier and your internet provider) have a responsibility to ensure that you are treated equally by accommodating your  individual circumstances that relate to protected grounds of discrimination. This is called the duty to accommodate.

If your employer refuses to provide alternative arrangements to accommodate your needs, and you have exhausted all other options to settle your dispute, you may have cause to file a discrimination complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission. Try using our complaint assessment tool to find out.

What can I do if a service provider refuses to accommodate my disability or religious beliefs?

Service providers (such as your bank, your wireless carrier and your internet provider) have a responsibility to ensure that you are treated equally by accommodating your  individual circumstances related to protected grounds of discrimination. This is called the duty to accommodate.

If a service provider refuses to provide alternative arrangements to accommodate your needs, and you have exhausted all other options to settle your dispute, you may have cause to file a discrimination complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission. Try using our complaint assessment tool to find out.

What can I do if my employer refuses to accommodate my family situation (taking care of a child or sick family member)?

Your employer has a responsibility to ensure that you are treated equally by accommodating your individual circumstances. This is called the duty to accommodate.

If your employer refuses to provide alternative arrangements to accommodate your needs, and you have exhausted all other options to settle your dispute, you may have cause to file a discrimination complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission. Try using our complaint assessment tool to find out. 

What can I do if my employer is forcing me to retire?

If your employer is forcing you to retire, and you have exhausted all other options to settle your dispute, you may have cause to file a discrimination complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission. Try using our complaint assessment tool to find out.

What can I do if I am being harassed or treated unfairly because of my (choose one or more of the following): 

  1. Disability 
  2. Race
  3. Skin colour
  4. Birthplace (national or ethnic origin) 
  5. Age 
  6. Gender (or gender identity)
  7. Family status (single parent, caregiver)
  8. Religious beliefs
  9. Sexual orientation
  10. Marital status (divorced, single)
  11. Conviction for which a pardon has been granted or a record suspended

In Canada, employers and service providers (such as your bank, your wireless carrier and your internet provider) may not treat you unfairly for any of the reasons stated above. In fact, these organizations are obligated to make every effort to accommodate your individual circumstances. This is called the duty to accommodate.

If you believe you have experienced discrimination or harassment because of one of the 11 grounds, and you have exhausted all other options to settle your dispute, you may have cause to file a discrimination complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission. Try using our complaint assessment tool to find out. 

What can I do if I was denied a service because of my (choose one or more of the following):

  1. Disability
  2. Race
  3. Skin colour
  4. Birthplace (national or ethnic origin) 
  5. Age 
  6. Gender (or gender identity)
  7. Family status (single parent, caregiver)
  8. Religious beliefs
  9. Sexual orientation
  10. Marital status (divorced, single)
  11. Conviction for which a pardon has been granted or a record suspended.

Service providers (such as your bank, your wireless carrier and your internet provider) may not treat you unfairly for any of the reasons stated above. In fact, service providers are obligated to make every effort to accommodate your individual circumstances that relate to protected grounds of discrimination. This is called the duty to accommodate.

If you believe you were denied a service because of one of the 11 grounds, and you have exhausted all other options to settle your dispute, you may have cause to file a discrimination complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission. Try using our complaint assessment tool to find out.

What can I do if I was laid off, fired or not offered an opportunity of my (choose one or more of the following):

  1. Disability 
  2. Race
  3. Skin colour
  4. Birthplace (national or ethnic origin)
  5. Age 
  6. Gender (or gender identity)
  7. Family status (single parent, caregiver)
  8. Religious beliefs
  9. Sexual orientation
  10. Marital status (divorced, single)
  11. Conviction for which a pardon has been granted or a record suspended.

In Canada, employers may not treat you unfairly for any of the reasons stated above. In fact, employers are obligated to make every effort to accommodate your individual circumstances. This is called the duty to accommodate.

If you believe you were laid off, fired or not offered an opportunity because of one of the 11 grounds, and you have exhausted all other options to settle your dispute, you may have cause to file a discrimination complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission. Try using our complaint assessment tool to find out.

Who can help me if I am being harassed or treated unfairly by a municipal, provincial or territorial organization?

These organizations include:

  • municipal, provincial or territorial governments (e.g.: City of Toronto, Government of Alberta)
  • municipal, provincial or territorial service providers (e.g.: police, ambulance, hospitals, Child and Family Services)

All complaints concerning a municipal, provincial or territorial organization fall under the responsibility of your province or territory. Please contact your provincial or territorial human rights commission to learn more.

What can I do if I am being harassed or treated unfairly by my landlord?

All complaints concerning lodging and accommodations fall under the responsibility of your province or territory. Please contact your provincial or territorial human rights commission to learn more.

Who can help me visit Canada, work in Canada, or move to Canada?

If you want to visit Canada, work in Canada, or live in Canada, your enquiries should be addressed to Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

Who can help me if my request to visit Canada, work in Canada, or move to Canada has been rejected?

All complaints or enquiries dealing with a request to visit Canada, work in Canada, or live in Canada should be addressed to Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

Who can help me if I am being deported?

All complaints or enquiries dealing with a deportation notice should be addressed to Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

Where can I apply if I am interested in working for the Canadian Human Rights Commission?

Applications for employment in the federal public service, including the Canadian Human Rights Commission, should be directed to the Public Service Commission of Canada. Visit the jobs.gc.ca website for all available opportunities.

Who can help me if I was subject to unfair workplace practices?

Here are some examples of unfair workplace practices:

  • I was not given an opportunity to apply for a position.
  • I was unfairly screened out of a hiring process.
  • I was forced to work on a public or religious holiday.
  • I was forced to work overtime.
  • I am not receiving my entire salary
  • I was unfairly terminated from my position
  • I am not allowed to take vacation.

If your complaint does not deal with one of the 11 grounds covered by the Canadian Human Rights Act, you may have cause to file a complaint under labour relations laws. Please contact your provincial, territorial or federal Labour Board to learn more.

Who can help me if my personal information has been mishandled?

All complaints or enquiries dealing with personal information should be directed to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.

Who can help me if someone has taken and/or is using my picture without my consent?

All complaints or enquiries dealing with the use of pictures without proper consent should be directed to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.

Who can help me if I am being recorded (video or audio) without my consent?

All complaints or enquiries dealing with being recorded (video or audio) without proper consent should be directed to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.

Who can help me if I heard or saw something on television or radio that I believe was inappropriate?

This might include programming that is discriminatory or that reinforces stereotypes. All complaints or enquiries dealing with unsuitable television or radio programming should be directed to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

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